I don't give advice freely, let alone for top dollar. I do seem to receive my fair share of the stuff, though. It usually comes hurling at me like bees to honey or, more appropriately, flies to doo-doo. Friends and family are absolutely thrilled to share their expert opinions, since they know I will take all advice and follow it to the letter. (When told by a dermatologist to be careful in the sun while using Retin-A, I took to wearing something resembling a beekeeper's outfit.) Recently, I pried into the memories of four stellar talents to find out what sage advice has helped them most in their careers. WHAT IS THE BEST PROFESSIONAL ADVICE YOU'VE EVER BEEN GIVEN?

Sam Harris
Sam Harris
Sam Harris

("Revival" at The Bottom Line, NYC, June 5 and 6)

Not to name drop, but...lots of very successful people have given me memorable advice through the years. Frank Langella told me that a career is built from the library of a lifetime, not single events. When we have expectations for everything we do rather than look at each project as simply that, we lose sight of the work and the process--and, of course, the expectation can never be fulfilled.

I used to sing a song and then rush into the next one or leave the stage as fast as possible. Shirley MacLaine said, "Don't apologize when you sing. Stand there and take your applause. The cycle of giving and receiving on stage is what separates live performing from the others."

Liza Minnelli told me, "Work from the 'why,' not the 'how'" when you approach a song or a character--think about why you are saying or doing something, not about how to do it. The why always secures the internal motivation rather than working from the outside in.

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Jane Summerhays
(Miss Madelaine True in The Wild Party)

My earliest influence was my dance teacher, William Christianson. He was one of the founders of Ballet West, which is where I trained. Mr. C. taught me to develop my talent to the utmost and to always have several options--not to narrow myself to one thing. As an actress, you bring everything you are to the stage, so the more you know and the more informed you are, the more you have to draw upon! Essentially, he taught me to do my homework.

My mother taught me to keep my options open and insisted that I get a good education. So I went to school, got a masters degree in theater, and then came to New York. The competition in this field is so strong, you have to be compelled to do it; otherwise, it's just too hard. It's more of a calling, in a way. Mother's advice was very sound. Having a good education gave me a very solid foundation for my life and career.

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Christopher Carl
(Miles Gloriosus in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, upcoming at Sacramento Music Circus)

I was in rehearsals for a production of The Unsinkable Molly Brown with Cathy Rigby, and we were learning the opening number. Cathy decided that she wanted to leap off the roof of the cabin into a haystack, then jump up onto a log pile, then leap with her feet straight out into the arms of the dancers. One of the dancers was nervous and thought the move was too tough. He thought the jump should be simplified. Cathy, in all sincerity, said, "Go for the gold!" and just leapt from eight feet away into the dancers' arms. She would have landed right on her back if she hadn't trusted herself and the others. She was fearless! When you're secure in your talents and you do the best you can do, you will succeed. That was an important lesson to learn.

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Amanda Green
Amanda Green
Amanda Green
(Singer/songwriter and Playboy columnist; new CD of original material available by email at AMANGREEN@aol.com )

My mother, the lovely Phyllis Newman, taught me to "go where you're wanted" and to "go where you have power." The subject came up a while back when a production company was alternately hiring me and canceling me again and again. I was going crazy! Playboy was very interested in me as a writer at that point, so she told me to concentrate on that part of my career. I find it's kind of like dating: You meet a great guy and you wonder, "Why doesn't he see how fabulous I am?" You can knock yourself against the wall, deciding what to wear and all that stuff, but the fact of the matter is that if he doesn't get it, he doesn't get it! It's exactly the same with the obstacles of show business: You may think you're perfect for a job, but if they don't like you, why kill yourself trying to change their mind? Put that energy into something more positive. Move on!