Dolly Parton
(© Joseph Marzullo/WENN)
Dolly Parton
(© Joseph Marzullo/WENN)
The National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress has announced the 25 sound recordings that will be newly added to its collection, which aims to highlight the richness of the nation's audio legacy and underscore the importance of assuring the long-term preservation of that legacy for future generations.

Among the newly added entries is the November 14, 1943 New York Philharmonic debut of a 25-year-old Leonard Bernstein, who was substituting at the last minute for both the regular and guest conductors; George and Ira Gershwin's "Fascinating Rhythm" in a 1938 cover of the song from Hawaiian steel guitar artist Sol Hoopii who went electric for this swinging recording; Dolly Parton's 1971 autobiographical song, "Coat of Many Colors"; Richard Rodgers ad Lorenz Hart's "Ten Cents a Dance" from Simple Simon, recorded by Ruth Etting who originated the role of Sal in the musical; and "Come Down Ma Evenin' Star," the only surviving recording of Lillian Russell, one of the greatest stars the American musical stage, who first introduced the John Stromberg tune in the 1902 burlesque review Twirly-Wirly.

Some of the other new entries include "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star" sung by one of Thomas Edison's employees for a talking doll that is the earliest known commercial recording; Bo Diddley's first single "I'm a Man"; the Vince Guaraldi Trio's soundtrack for A Charlie Brown Christmas; Donna Summer's 1977 dance club hit "I Feel Love"; and Prince and the Revolution's 1984 album Purple Rain.

Click here for more information and a full list of new entries into the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress.