Garry Hynes
(© Joseph Marzullo / WENN)
Garry Hynes
(© Joseph Marzullo / WENN)
Plans for Hampstead Theatre's 2012 season have been announced. Among the highlights is artistic director Edward Hall helming the world premiere stage adaptation of Chariots of Fire, written by Mike Bartlett, and based on the Oscar-winning film of the same name. The production will run May 9-June 16.

The work tells the inspiring true story of two great athletes, outsiders who overcome prejudice and personal strife to compete in the 1924 Paris Olympics. Miriam Buether's scenic design will transform the Hampstead into a stadium-like environment for a more immersive experience.

The production will feature the music of the legendary Vangelis score with additional live music and arrangements by Tony Award winning composer Jason Carr. The show will feature lighting by Rick Fisher, choreography by Scott Ambler and sound by Paul Groothuis.

The Hampstead season will also include the return of Ireland's foremost theatre company, Druid, with an epic staging of three Tom Murphy plays under the collective title, DruidMurphy (June 20-30), which is part of the London 2012 Festival. Garry Hynes will direct the works, which include Conversations on a Homecoming, A Whistle in the Dark, and Famine. They will be designed by Francis O'Connor with costumes by Joan O'Clery, lighting by Chris Davey and sound by Gregory Clarke.

There will be a new London season from international award winning Shakespeare company Propeller featuring Henry V and The Winter's Tale (July 3-21), directed by Edward Hall, designed by Michael Pavelka, with lighting by Ben Ormerod, music by Propeller and sound by David Gregory.

Hampstead will coproduce with ENO Wolfgang Rihm's opera, Jacob Lenz (April 17-27), directed by Sam Brown, conducted by Alexander Ingram, and translated by Richard Stokes.

Hampstead downstairs continues to produce new work, including Nigel Gearing's Blue Heart Afternoon (April 5-May 12), directed by Tamara Harvey, and Nick Whitby's The Complaint (May 17-June 16), directed by Simon Usher.

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