Le Gourmand or Gluttony!

Connelly Theater
220 E 4th St, New York, NY 10009
Click for map and directions
3/5 stars from 2 users.WRITE A REVIEW

USER REVIEWS

Theres something magical happening at The Connelly Theater on east 4th street. An invasion of sorts from an Uber talented collective who have settled in Manhattan, being freshly plucked and well seasoned, The Minnesota Mafia, not their official title have offered us an exquisite theatrical dish, a gastronomical musical magnifique. "Le Gourmand" which is set in Revolutionary France, tells a saucy tale of Grimod de la Reyniere - A gluttonous, spoilt-twenty-something brat of enormous proportions, who must find himself after being banished to Lyon by his wealthy parents from their home in Paris. And what The Three Sticks Theater Company their official title, has achieved is a mini-operatic event, replete with white powdered, rosy cheek make-up, a central backdrop lit with cut-out silhouettes and a cast blessed with scrumptious vocal instruments. Jason Bohan directs with tongue-in-cheek precision, and the classical fare is served by solo pianist Andrew Lynch and writer/lyricist Nick Ryan. "Gourmand" is as much a tour de force as it is a joie de vivre. This is a story that resonates especially in our economic climate where societal opprobrium against the wealthy class is peppered throughout Europe and now bubbles with revolutionary fervor in America. "Gourmand" strikes a clever balance between celebrating haute cuisine and demonizing excess while the multitudes suffer. It is a ten course tale with an opening amuse-bouche, each course comes with witty transitions sung by Mr. Lynch such as "A familial dispute, served with a jus of stubbornness". The lyrics, equally amusing, blend class warfare with the quest for satiating ones inexhaustible appetite - as is the case with Grimod. Add to that a roaringly funny, lovesick Napolean Bonaparte, who pines after Josephine "I think shes going to leave me". The wily Grimod survives the guillotine and throws an end of revolution dinner party, a culinary event where no beast is sacred and consumption has no limits. This is Fringe fantastique. You will be entertained. You will be transported. And whether by luck or design, this treat of an evening has been placed in a wonderful old theater giving "Gourmand" the right ambiance it so richly deserves. My only wish would be more. With a short running time of 75 minutes there is more story here to be told.

RE:An Appetite For Class Warfare

Theres something magical happening at The Connelly Theater on east 4th street. An invasion of sorts from an Uber talented collective who have settled in Manhattan, being freshly plucked and well seasoned, The Minnesota Mafia, not their official title have offered us an exquisite theatrical dish, a gastronomical musical magnifique. "Le Gourmand" which is set in French Revolution France, tells a saucy tale of Grimod de la Reyniere - A gluttonous, spoilt-twenty-something brat of enormous proportions, who must find himself after being banished to Lyon by his wealthy parents from their home in Paris. And what The Three Sticks Theater Company their official title, has achieved is a mini-operatic event, replete with white powdered, rosy cheeked make-up, a central backdrop lit with cut-out silhouettes and a cast blessed with scrumptious vocal instruments. The direction by Jason Bohan is basted with tongue-in-cheek precision and the classical fare is served by solo pianist Andrew Lynch and writer/lyricist Nick Ryan. "Gourmand" is as much a tour de force as it is a joie de vivre. This is a story that resonates especially in our economic climate where societal opprobrium against the wealthy class is peppered throughout Europe and now bubbles with revolutionary fervor in America. "Gourmand" strikes a clever balance between celebrating haute cuisine and demonizing excess while the multitudes suffer. It is a ten course tale with an opening amuse-bouche, each course comes with witty transitions sung by Mr. Lynch such as "A familial dispute, served with a jus of stubbornness". The lyrics, equally amusing, blend class warfare with the quest for satiating ones inexhaustible appetite - as is the case with Grimod. Add to that a roaringly funny, lovesick Napolean Bonaparte, who pines after Josephine "I think shes going to leave me". The wily Grimod survives the guillotine and throws an end of revolution dinner party, a culinary event where no beast is sacred and consumption has no limits. This is Fringe fantastique. You will be entertained. You will be transported. And whether by luck or design, this treat of an evening has been placed in a wonderful old theater giving "Gourmand" the right ambiance it so richly deserves. My only wish would be more. With a short running time of 75 minutes there is more story here to be told.