Clybourne Park

Closed
Opened Feb 21, 2010
4/5 stars from 2 users.WRITE A REVIEW

USER REVIEWS

Clybourne Park is Worth a Visit

The connection to A Raisin In The Sun begins when Karl Linder tries to prevent a white family in Clybourne Park from selling their home to a black family. It?s implied, but never confirmed that this is the Younger family from A Raisin in the Sun. The selling price for the home is drastically reduced due to a family tragedy. Could the black family afford a home in Clybourne Park at a normal price? Can they maintain it? What about their eating, shopping and social habits? Fast forward many years later and the black family has moved out, the house is in a total state of disarray, and a white family moves back in as gentrification arrives in Clybourne Park. Thought-provoking issues are raised in this play, and I appreciated how the black couple disproved several ignorant misconceptions held by their arroogant white peers. Its said that playwright Bruce Norris leaves "no stone unturned" in this drama, yet I beg to differ. The stone he should have turned over was the one actually showing the black family living in the home instead of leaving the audience simply to hear about them. The piece was well acted and attention grabbing, despite the crude jokes in the second act which bordered on dysfunction. This play left me with much to think about, especially as I look around my own neighborhood. ?

RE:Clybourne Park is Worth a Visit

The connection to A Raisin In The Sun begins when Karl Linder tries to prevent a white family in Clybourne Park from selling their home to a black family. It?s implied, but never confirmed that this is the Younger family from A Raisin in the Sun. The selling price for the home is drastically reduced due to a family tragedy. Could the black family afford a home in Clybourne Park at a normal price? Can they maintain it? What about their eating, shopping and social habits? Fast forward many years later and the black family has moved out, the house is in a total state of disarray, and a white family moves back in as gentrification arrives in Clybourne Park. Thought-provoking issues are raised in this play, and I appreciated how the black couple disproved several ignorant misconceptions held by their arroogant white peers. Its said that playwright Bruce Norris leaves "no stone unturned" in this drama, yet I beg to differ. The stone he should have turned over was the one actually showing the black family living in the home instead of leaving the audience simply to hear about them. The piece was well acted and attention grabbing, despite the crude jokes in the second act which bordered on dysfunction. This play left me with much to think about, especially as I look around my own neighborhood. ?