The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Baruch Performing Arts Center
55 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10010
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WHAT IS IT ABOUT?

Baruch Performing Arts Center and the students of Professor Abe Tawil's Management 3120 class present the 1975 film The Rocky Horror Picture Show, preceded by a costume competition for all audience members with a $100 grand prize award, $50 second prize award, and $25 third prize award. The costume competition begins at 6pm, and the film begins at 7pm. The awards are announced after the film ends. All proceeds benefit the Baruch Performing Arts Center at Baruch College. The Rocky Horror Picture Show is the 1975 film adaptation of the British classic rock musical stageplay, The Rocky Horror Show, written by Richard O'Brien. The film is a parody of science fiction and B-movie horror films. Director Jim Sharman collaborated on the screenplay with O'Brien, who wrote both the book and lyrics for the stage. The film marks the debut performance of stage and screen actor Tim Curry and features legendary film actress Susan Sarandon with Barry Bostwick along with cast members from the original Kings Road production presented at the Royal Court Theatre, London, in 1973. The playwright of the theater production and screenwriter of the film Richard O'Brien played the character Riff Raff, the handyman or "butler" as audiences came to know him. Legendary folklore states that O'Brien wrote the play based on a dream. The film was a highly provocative, though comedic, portrayal of gay and transgender culture. Still in limited release 35 years after its premiere, it has the longest-running theatrical release in film history. It gained notoriety as a midnight movie in 1977 when audiences began participating with the film in theatres. The motion picture has a large international following and is one of the most well-known and financially successful midnight movies of all time. In 2005, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".