Elisha Abas: The People's Pianist

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Opened Sep 28, 2008
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WHAT IS IT ABOUT?

Elisha Abas is quickly gaining world wide recognition as the People's Pianist, one that appeals to the masses and is quickly acquiring a large following of people "under 40 and hip" as described by The New York Times, during his recent return to Carnegie Hall in November 2007. In July 2008, Abas conducted a tour throughout Northern and Southern Italy, performing in unconventional venues such as Naples' Palazzo Delle Art, a modern art museum and Riomaggiore's (in Cinque Terre National Park) Ancient Castle. He captured the hearts of the Italian people. La Roma, National Italian Newspaper, commented on his performance in Naples, Italy saying, "he is the most refined and interesting pianists of our generation…his "playing is the perfect marriage of exuberant musicality restrained with the right dose of rationalism that is rich with colors and shades. His palette shines in all his splendor with a captivating performance of Chopin and Schumann." Elisha Abas has been described by many industry luminaries as "one of a kind", who has the "rare quality as a musician to sing his musical phrases in time, yet as free as can be". He projects a rare combination of intellect, elegance and pedigree. As a mentee of Artur Rubinstein and a student of the Alfred Cortot School, he has an authentic spirit and electrifying rhythm that makes you cry. Likely inherited from his great-great grandfather legendary Russian Composer Alexander Scriabin, his rare interpretations are strongly reminiscent of the old masters. Abas is a true renaissance-like artist. He started his performance career at the age of six and by the time he was in his late teens he had already shared the stage with Masters such as Zubin Mehta, Isaac Stern, and Leonard Bernstein. After a ten year international performance career performing in venues such as Royal Albert Hall and Carnegie Hall and with some of the world's most prestigious orchestras, he took a break from the performance stage to play professional soccer, in Israel's Premier League and to obtain a law degree. In late 2006, while still in his early 30s, he returned to the world stage promoting the idea that "classical music belongs to all people" and "it is strictly emotional and not intellectual". After the Baruch Performance, Abas will return to his great great grand father's country Russia, for performances in St. Petersburg and Moscow.