Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Closed
3hr. (2 intermission)
Opened Oct 13, 2012
5/5 stars from 3 users.WRITE A REVIEW

USER REVIEWS

VIVA STEPPENWOLF!!!

This revival of Edward Albee's magnificent play shines. The cast is flawless. Tracy Letts who just happened to pen my favorite play August: Osage County does a terrific job backed with the extremely talented Amy Morton portraying George and Martha, an explosive couple engaging in a battle of wits using an unsuspecting young couple Nick and Honey wonderfully portrayed by Carrie Coons and Madison Dirks as pawns in their mind bending game. The play really is about the love George and Martha have for each other although they express it in a most bizarre manner. The set design and direction are top notch and the acting is superb. This is what theater is all about. Although the play runs three hours, the time flies by and you are left drained but begging for more. With a cast like this coupled with Albee's stinging dialog you can't go wrong. You really have to see this wonderful production. In my opinion this is the best show to come to Broadway in a long time. See this one at all costs.

Terrific Revival of Albee's Classic Play

This latest revival of Albee's classic is as good as any we've ever seen. Amy Morton, who starred in the Pulitzer Prize and Tony winning August: Osage County and who received a well-deserved Tony nomination for her performance in that play, surely merits a similar nomination for her performance as Martha in this production. While she plays her role as George's bitter, shrewish, mentally unbalanced, and emasculating wife in a somewhat lower register than did her predecessors, we mean that as a compliment, not a criticism. It has allowed Tracy Letts, the highly regarded Chicago actor who wrote August: Osage County and who is making his Broadway debut here as George, to play his role even more dynamically that had his very talented predecessors. Carrie Coon as Honey and Madison Dirks as Nick round out the ensemble cast and do so brilliantly. When Nick and Honey arrive at George and Martha's home after 2 AM, the already have had too much to drink (as have George and Martha) but that doesn't stop any of them from imbibing even more. One thing leads to another and the sexual tensions, pent-up emotions, and long held secrets that are released are explosive. Distinctions between reality and fantasy are increasingly blurred and the inevitable crisis toward which the play has been building is…well, inevitable. I have posted an expanded version of this review and reviews of other Broadway, off Broadway and off off Broadway plays on my blog www.aseatontheaisle.blogspot.com.

Terrific Revival of Albee's Classic Play

This latest revival of Albee's classic is as good as any we've ever seen. Amy Morton, who starred in the Pulitzer Prize and Tony winning August: Osage County and who received a well-deserved Tony nomination for her performance in that play, surely merits a similar nomination for her performance as Martha in this production. While she plays her role as George's bitter, shrewish, mentally unbalanced, and emasculating wife in a somewhat lower register than did her predecessors, we mean that as a compliment, not a criticism. It has allowed Tracy Letts, the highly regarded Chicago actor who wrote August: Osage County and who is making his Broadway debut here as George, to play his role even more dynamically that had his very talented predecessors. Carrie Coon as Honey and Madison Dirks as Nick round out the ensemble cast and do so brilliantly. When Nick and Honey arrive at George and Martha's home after 2 AM, the already have had too much to drink (as have George and Martha) but that doesn't stop any of them from imbibing even more. One thing leads to another and the sexual tensions, pent-up emotions, and long held secrets that are released are explosive. Distinctions between reality and fantasy are increasingly blurred and the inevitable crisis toward which the play has been building is…well, inevitable. I have posted an expanded version of this review and reviews of other Broadway, off Broadway and off off Broadway plays on my blog www.aseatontheaisle.blogspot.com.